06 Mar 2018

Top 10 Things Your Child Needs to Know Before Kindergarten

Even if your child has been in a day care or child care centre, kindergarten is still a big deal. Read on the top tips to foster the best kind of “kinder-readiness”.  

 

Practice writing their name. 
While everyone knows that your child won’t fail kindergarten even if he can’t string those few letters together, but still, it won’t hurt if he try. Just think of the extra confidence boost your child will get if he can. It doesn’t have to be perfect, but always strive for legibility. Your child will have plenty of time to master his work as soon as his school starts.

Encourage your child to be curious. 
Have you ever heard of the word “executive functioning”? It is just a fancy way used to describe a skills set which include multi-tasking, decision making, and persistence. And one way to foster a child’s executive functioning is through creative play. Let your child get curious about things. Get out some of those blocks and legos and let them practice building cities or let them play a role play scenario like doctors or restaurants. This will let your child gain confidence in their decision-making process which they will need once their kindergarten starts.

Begin teaching them about letters. 
The first step of reading readiness is by recognising letters. Kids usually learn how to recognise letters in their early child care or day care. Flashcards are a good example to teach them how to recognise alphabets. As your child calls out each letter, ask them about the sound that letter makes. After your child finishes recognising all the letters, help them arrange each letter alphabetical order.  

Expose them to math concepts. 
We are not talking about advanced calculus being taught to children. A general number sense before your child goes to a childcare centre will do and one of the easiest ways to do this is by incorporating mathematics in their everyday activities - such as counting steps as they walk, sorting coins and counting them together or other activities which will give your child a head start when they begin child care at bestchance.

Help them master some few sight words.
These are words that are used often yet can be difficult to sound out such as my, have, she, said, been or was. This is the reason why most kindergarten curriculums teach them to kids by recognising them on sight.

Memorise their miscellaneous information.
Help your child remember not just their first name but also their last name, address as well as their phone number.

Help your child practice sitting still. 
There is a general rule of thumb where the minutes your child should be able to sit still should be equal to your child’s age in double. For instance, if your child is 2 years old, he is expected not to wiggle around for at least 4 minutes.

Practice storytelling. 
Create stories together. Cut pictures from catalogs or magazines and come up with a creative and logical storyline together.

Let your child fail. 
Any parent might find it hard to allow their child feel pain. However, your child should learn how to cope with trials and hardships on their own. So let them fail. Let them run to you with their wounded knee, let them learn to bring a backup pair of their goggles to the swim and open them to learning which they will experience at most family day care centres, click here for more information about family day care and how to enrol your child.

Lastly, encourage your child the love of learning. Help them cultivate their confidence and independence even while they are at home.

Even if your child has been in a day care or child care centre, kindergarten is still a big deal. Read on the top tips to foster the best kind of “kinder-readiness”.  

 

Practice writing their name. 
While everyone knows that your child won’t fail kindergarten even if he can’t string those few letters together, but still, it won’t hurt if he try. Just think of the extra confidence boost your child will get if he can. It doesn’t have to be perfect, but always strive for legibility. Your child will have plenty of time to master his work as soon as his school starts.

Encourage your child to be curious. 
Have you ever heard of the word “executive functioning”? It is just a fancy way used to describe a skills set which include multi-tasking, decision making, and persistence. And one way to foster a child’s executive functioning is through creative play. Let your child get curious about things. Get out some of those blocks and legos and let them practice building cities or let them play a role play scenario like doctors or restaurants. This will let your child gain confidence in their decision-making process which they will need once their kindergarten starts.

Begin teaching them about letters. 
The first step of reading readiness is by recognising letters. Kids usually learn how to recognise letters in their early child care or day care. Flashcards are a good example to teach them how to recognise alphabets. As your child calls out each letter, ask them about the sound that letter makes. After your child finishes recognising all the letters, help them arrange each letter alphabetical order.  

Expose them to math concepts. 
We are not talking about advanced calculus being taught to children. A general number sense before your child goes to a childcare centre will do and one of the easiest ways to do this is by incorporating mathematics in their everyday activities - such as counting steps as they walk, sorting coins and counting them together or other activities which will give your child a head start when they begin child care at bestchance.

Help them master some few sight words.
These are words that are used often yet can be difficult to sound out such as my, have, she, said, been or was. This is the reason why most kindergarten curriculums teach them to kids by recognising them on sight.

Memorise their miscellaneous information.
Help your child remember not just their first name but also their last name, address as well as their phone number.

Help your child practice sitting still. 
There is a general rule of thumb where the minutes your child should be able to sit still should be equal to your child’s age in double. For instance, if your child is 2 years old, he is expected not to wiggle around for at least 4 minutes.

Practice storytelling. 
Create stories together. Cut pictures from catalogs or magazines and come up with a creative and logical storyline together.

Let your child fail. 
Any parent might find it hard to allow their child feel pain. However, your child should learn how to cope with trials and hardships on their own. So let them fail. Let them run to you with their wounded knee, let them learn to bring a backup pair of their goggles to the swim and open them to learning which they will experience at most family day care centres, click here for more information about family day care and how to enrol your child.

Lastly, encourage your child the love of learning. Help them cultivate their confidence and independence even while they are at home.